[IMAGE]
SimpleHost Webstats produced by Analog 4.15

Do you want to see a
CARD TRICK?

AIRPLANES

SPAMMERS CLICK HERE!

SPAM PAYMENT INFO

[IMAGE]

Paul K. Guillow, Inc. Balsa Wood Airplanes STEARMAN PT-17

[IMAGE]

Kit Number: 803 Wing Span: 28" Scale: 1/16: Plan Blown to 84" Wingspan...

[IMAGE] The majority of U.S. pilots of World War 2 received their primary flight training in the famous Stearman Trainer. This excellent 2-place biplane was known as the PT-17 when delivered to Army flight training centers. The Navy designations were N2S-1 and N2S-4. Nearly 3,000 were built in the 1940-43 period and, in the post war era and up to modern times, the Stearman Trainer has been successfully used as a stunt plane and crop duster.

The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 is a biplane, of which 8584 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s as a military trainer aircraft. Stearman became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Widely known as the Stearman, Boeing Stearman or Kaydet, it served as a Primary trainer for the USAAF, as a basic trainer for the USN (as the NS1 & N2S), and with the RCAF as the Kaydet throughout World War II. After the conflict was over, thousands of surplus aircraft were sold on the civil market. In the immediate post-war years they became popular as crop dusters and as sports planes.

The Kaydet was of rugged construction, and conventional biplane design with large, fixed tailwheel undercarriage, and accommodation for the student and instructor in open cockpits in tandem. The radial engine was usually uncowled, although some Stearman operators choose to cowl the engine, most notably the Red Baron Stearman Squadron.

Even though the US Army Air Corps needed a new biplane trainer in the mid-1930's, it moved slowly to acquire one because of the service-wide lack of funding for new airplane purchases. In 1936, following the Navy's lead the previous year, the Army tentatively bought 26 airframes from Boeing (the Model 75), which the Army named the PT-13. With war on the horizon, this trickle of acquisition soon turned into a torrent; 3519 were delivered in 1940 alone.

[IMAGE]
Roxy Sue Parker, Chief Engineer

Built as a private venture by the Stearman Aircraft Company of Wichita (bought by Boeing in 1934), this two-seat biplane was of mixed construction. The wings were of wood with fabric covering while the fuselage had a tough, welded steel framework, also fabric covered. Either a Lycoming R-680 (PT-13) or Continental R-670 (PT-17) engine powered most models, at a top speed of 124 mph with a 505-mile range. An engine shortage in 1940-41 led to the installation of 225-hp Jacobs R-755 engines on some 150 airframes, and the new designation PT-18.

The US Navy's early aircraft, designated NS-1, eventually evolved into the N2S series, and the Royal Canadian Air Force called their Lend-Lease aircraft PT-27s. (The Canadians were also responsible for the moniker "Kaydet," a name eventually adopted by air forces around the globe).

The plane was easy to fly, and relatively forgiving of new pilots. It gained a reputation as a rugged airplane and a good teacher. Officially named the Boeing Model 75, the plane was (and still is) persistently known as the "Stearman" by many who flew them. It was called the "PT" by the Army, "N2S" by the Navy and "Kaydet" by Canadian forces. By whatever name, more than 10,000 were built by the end of 1945 and at least 1,000 are still flying today worldwide. [History by Jeff VanDerford.]

Yellow Peril. (Some Stearman owners claim this name resulted specifically from the Stearman's allegedly challenging ground-handling characteristics, but most WWII veterans contend that the nickname was more of a generic reference to the dangerous nature of primary flight training, an endeavor in which the Stearman obviously played a major role. Other aircraft such as the N3N also carried the Yellow Peril nickname.)

The PT-17 Stearman is literally the airplane that has always seemed to just be "there." Although, it is most often thought of as the school marm that taught a generation of airmen the skills necessary to win a war, she has actually lived three distinct lives and is entering a fourth-from military trainer to crop duster, airshow performer, and now, much loved antique.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

When Boeing bought Stearman Aircraft in 1934, they already had a new design on the drawing board they eventually designated the Model 75. The military knew they desperately needed a new, totally reliable trainer, but times were tough and money was tight. Money was so tight, in fact, that Stearman/Boeing had developed the new bird using their own money. Luckily, when the prototype flew in 1936, the Army dug deep enough into its pockets to buy a few dozen of the new design.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

The military had just begun to appreciate the tremendous abilities of their new trainer when the winds of war began to stir up dust on the horizon and the aviation industry became one of the first to go on a war footing. It was well accepted that the country would need pilots, which meant it first needed trainers and the Stearman was definitely on its way to stardom. It would be known as the PT-13 (Lycoming R-680, 225 hp engine), PT-17 (Continental) W-670, 220hp), N2S (USN w/Continental), PT-18 (245hp Jacobs) and PT-27 (Canadian w/Continental).

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

By the time the war ended, approximately 10,300 Stearman had been built and they were sold at auction on a where-is, as-is basis. This meant that each base simply lined their airplanes up and the new buyers came and flew them away for as little as $300 a piece with the tanks freshly filled (a military policy).

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

After the war, crop dusting wasn't anything new, but with the arrival of a seemingly unlimited supply of inexpensive airplanes and parts, the concept really took off (sorry, couldn't resist). By bolting on the 450 hp P & W engine and prop from an otherwise useless surplus BT-13, the perfect bug swatter was created and 450 Stearmans criss-crossed America's farmlands for decades. It wasn't until the early 1960's, when newer airplanes designed specifically for crop dusting appeared, that the Stearman had to go looking for other work.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

Those Stearman's that weren't working as crop dusters immediately put on colorful airshow paint jobs and looped and rolled their way into the 1960's. By this time, airshows had become not only socially acceptable, but some performers found they could actually make money at it. If they lived long enough, that is. The 450 hp Stearman was king of the center ring. It was loud and, while it was cavorting like a huge sea otter, it would belch out enough smoke to eradicate mosquitos in two counties.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

The Stearman will never completely disappear from the airshow scene, but many of its performance slots are now taken by zippy, tumbling little bumble bees. Still, she has become the darling of the antique set. While she's not in the league with a Staggerwing and is definitely different than a WACO, she's found a spot in a lot of folk's hearts that guarantees she'll be living in high cotton for the rest of her life.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

Stearman trainers first entered service in 1936. They were used by the USAAF, US Navy and Royal Canadian Air Force. In the Second World War, most American service pilots learned to fly in this sturdy biplane. The Stearman has the same aura of nostalgia for wartime pilots from North America as the de Havilland Tiger Moth has for the British. Various models were built, the numbers simply indicating the use of different engines. The US Navy called them the N2S series. Army Air Force trainees flew their first 70 training hours in one of these aircraft before moving on to basic training in aircraft such as the Vultee Valiant. The total production of the Stearman family of military trainers was 6,110. A hardy, reliable aircraft, many hundreds were converted for agricultural work after the war.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

When it comes to military trainer biplanes, none is more well-known than the Stearman PT-17. More than 10,000 of these rugged, fairly easy to fly primary trainers were built by the end of WWII. Today, they are still very popular in the stock military configuration and in the higher performance version-the Super Stearman-that's used by various airshow and skywriting teams. With such a long and positive history it's little wonder that so many RC Stearmans have been built.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

Boieng Stearman PT-17 ’Kaydet’ Nicknamed the ”Yellow Peril” thanks to its somewhat tricky ground handling characteristics, the Stearman is one of the most easily recognized air- craft. Its simple construction, rugged dependability and nimble handling made the Stearman much loved by those who flew and trained on it. The Stearman Kaydet, as it was officially named, was the only American air- craft used during World War II that was completely standardized for both Army and Navy use as the PT 13D (Army) and N255 (Navy). Sold by the thousands after World War II, the Stearman has had a long and full career as a trainer, crop duster and air show per- former.

The famed Stearman Model 75 has its roots in the earlier Model 70, which was chosen in 1934 as the U.S. Navy’s primary trainer. At a time when bi- planes were becoming a thing of the past, the Model 70 offered the fledgling pilot a steady and sturdy steed. Designed and built in only 60 days, the prototype Model 70 could withstand load factors much higher than were expected to occur in normal flight training. The U.S. Army and Navy tested the prototype in 1934. At the conclusion of these tests, the Navy ordered the air- craft while the Army decided to wait for the introduc- tion of the improved Model 75 appearing in 1936. Over the next decade, the Armydecided to wait for the in- troduction of the improved Model 75 appearing in 1936. Over the next decade, the Army received nearly 8,500 Stearmans in five different variants. The difference among these versions were the engines fitted; Kaydets were fitted with Lycoming (PT 13), Continental (PT 17) or Jacobs (PT 18) radial engines. The U.S. Navy took delivery of their first Stearman (called the NS-1 ) in 1934. Powered with the obsolete but readily avail- able Wright R-790-8 engine, the NS-1 proved its worth as a primary trainer. The Navy purchased several thou- sand of an improved model, the N2S. The N2S was built in five sub variants, each variant being equipped with a different model engine. Additionally, the Cana- dian armed forces took delivery of 300 PT 27s, a win- terized version of the PT 17. A later, more powerful version of the Stearman, the Model 76, was purchased by Argentina, Brazil and the Philippines.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

The Stearman PT-17, nicknamed "Kaydet", was the most widely used primary trainer of the Allied air forces in World War II. Not only did this two-place biplane serve as a flying classroom for countless Allied pilots, but it also closed a chapter in American aviation by being the last military production biplane built in the United States. Lloyd C. Stearman, founder of the Stearman Aircraft Co., in Venice, California, Jack Clark and Harold Zipp designed the Stearman model 75 “Kaydet” in 1926 (The prototype of the Kaydet, model 70 was designed in 1933 from the model 6 Cloudboy which Lloyd Stearman designed). The Stearman Company was moved to Wichita, Kansas in 1927 and subsequently became part of the larger Boeing Aircraft Company in 1938. The first model 75, the X75 prototype, was test flown in September 1934. By February 1945, the Stearman Aircraft Company had built over eight thousand Kaydet airplanes in Wichita for the U.S. Army Air Corps (PT-17) and U.S. Navy (N2S) to use as primary military trainers. During this 11-year span, more American military pilots learned to fly in Stearmans than any other airplane. Changes in power plants brought about different numerical designations. The PT-17 was fitted with a Continental R-670 engine, whereas the PT-13 had a Lycoming R-680 engine and the PT-18 carried a Jacobs R-755 engine. A later version which featured a cockpit canopy was designated the PT-27. Total production of the Kaydet series reached 10,346 aircraft for the U. S. and its Allies. Following World War II, the Kaydet was phased out in favor of more modern trainers.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

The most widely used primary trainer of the Allied armed forces in World War II was the Stearman PT-17, nicknamed "Kaydet." During World War II, Warner Robins Air Service Command (WRASC) was responsible for supply and depot maintenance of all U. S. Army aircraft in its assigned geographical area. This initially included Georgia, South Carolina, most of Florida and finally, North Carolina and Virginia. Flight training was extensive and the WRASC area contained more than 6,500 aircraft of all types, including the Kaydet.

Not only did this two-place biplane serve as a flying classroom for countless Allied pilots, but it also closed a chapter in American aviation. The Kaydet was the last production military biplane built in the United States.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

The Stearman model 75 "Kaydet" can trace its design and heritage back to Lloyd C. Stearman, founder of the Stearman Aircraft Co., at Venice, California, in 1926. The Stearman Company was moved to Wichita, Kansas in 1927 and subsequently became part of the larger Boeing Aircraft company.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

The first model 75, the X75 prototype, was test flown in September 1934. By February 1945, the Stearman Aircraft Co.., had built over eight thousand Kaydet airplanes in Wichita for the U.S. Army Air Corps (PT-17) and U.S. Navy (N2S) to use as primary military trainers. During this 11-year span, more American military pilots learned to fly in the Stearman model 75 primary trainer than any other airplane.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

Changes in power plants brought about different numerical designations. The PT-17 was fitted with a Continental engine, whereas the PT-13 had a Lycoming engine and the PT-18 carried a Jacobs engine. A later version which featured a cockpit canopy was designated the PT-27. Total production of Kaydets reached 10,346 aircraft for the U. S. and its Allies. Following World War II, the Kaydet was phased out in favor of more modern trainers.

Under the U.S. Government's lend-lease program, the model 75's were also built and loaned for pilot training to the countries of Brazil, Venezuela, Philippines, Peru, Cuba, Bolivia, Paraguay, Columbia, China, Guatemala, the Dominican Republic, and Canada.

[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

NEXT?:

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE Item: 403 Wing Span: 24 5/8" Scale: 1/16 (BLOWN TO 75" wingspan...) maybe....

Parker Information Resources
Houston, Texas
E-mail: bparker@parkerinfo.com
[PIR]

The HTML Writers Guild
Notepad only
[raphael]
[hbd]
[Netscape]
[PIR]