[IMAGE
SimpleHost Webstats produced by Analog 4.15

Do you want to see a
CARD TRICK?

AIRPLANES

SPAMMERS CLICK HERE!

SPAM PAYMENT INFO

[IMAGE

[IMAGE

Easy Built Models FF-82 Moffett by Roy Nelder
Wingspan: 46""
Class: Sport flyer
Building Skill / Flying Skill: Experienced / Experienced

The Moffett Roy Nelder is a scale, flying model that uses the Box and Former method of construction. This is Roy Nelder's original 1940 champion plane from 1938/1940 International Moffett Trophy Contest. Great flying, high - wing endurance plane. Includes updated plans. Pre - 1942 design, eligible for Society of Antique Modelers contests.

This free flight rubber powered kit contains a full - size rolled plan, building and flying instructions, printed balsa wood, hand - picked balsa stripwood, rubber motor, propeller, nose package, wire, and Easy Built Lite colored tissue. You will need a building board, pins, hobby knife, fine sandpaper, and glue.

[IMAGE William Adger Moffett (October 31, 1869 - April 4, 1933) was an American admiral notable as the architect of naval aviation in the United States Navy.

Born October 31, 1869 in Charleston, South Carolina, he graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1890. He was the son of George Hall Moffett (1829 - 1875), who enlisted in the Confederate States army as a private, and was promoted for bravery on the field of battle, eventually attaining the rank of adjutant - general, Hagood's Brigade, Twenty - fifth South Carolina Volunteers.

Moffett was on USS Charleston (C - 2) when she sailed across the Pacific and captured Guam. Ultimately ending up in the Philippines, a month after the US victory at Manila Bay. The USS Charleston then shelled enemy positions in support of American and Filipino troops at the Battle of Manila (1898).

He received the Medal of Honor for his captaincy of the USS Chester in a daring and dangerous night landing in 1914 at Veracruz, Veracruz, Mexico. (See also United States occupation of Veracruz, 1914).

In World War I, he was commander of the Great Lakes Naval Training Center near Chicago, and there established an aviator training program. While commanding the battleship USS Mississippi (1918 - 1921) he supported the creation of a scout plane unit on the ship.

Although not himself a flyer, Moffett became known as the "Air Admiral" for his leadership of the Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics from its creation in 1921. In this role, he oversaw the development of tactics for naval aircraft, the introduction of the aircraft carrier, and relations with the civilian aircraft industry. A master politician, he maintained official support for naval aviation against Billy Mitchell, who favored putting all military aircraft into a separate air force. In that regard, Moffett benefited from his longstanding friendship with Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had been appointed Assistant Secretary of the Navy by Woodrow Wilson in 1913.

[IMAGE Moffett was also an advocate of the development of lighter - than - air airships, or "dirigibles."

He lost his life on the USS Akron when that airship, which was then the largest dirigible in the world, went down in a storm off the coast of New Jersey on April 4, 1933.

He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, alongside his wife Jeanette Whitton Moffett. One of their three sons William Adger Moffett, Jr. was also a Navy admiral; he died in 2001, and is also buried in Arlington Cemetery.

An 1890 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, Moffett saw action in the Spanish - American War and the Veracruz expedition of 1914. He became director of naval aviation in March 1921 after successfully using small aircraft to spot the gunfire of the battleship Mississippi, which he commanded.

In July 1921 Moffett was appointed chief of the navy's newly created Bureau of Aeronautics, and served three successive terms in this position with the rank of rear admiral. He lobbied effectively for acceptance of aviation with the navy, in the halls of Congress, and in the public arena. Moffett's skills at low - keyed political maneuvering helped to counter naval aviation's most flamboyant critic, Gen. Billy Mitchell of the Army Air Service. Moffett participated in the Washington and London naval arms limitation conferences (leading to their respective treaties); in 1922 he also qualified as a naval aviation observer.

Within the bureau and the fleet, Moffett concentrated on the development of patrol and scouting seaplanes and dirigibles, airplane technology and logistics, aircraft carriers, and naval air stations. His genius as manager and advocate led to success in virtually all categories - except airships. In 1933, he was aboard the navy dirigible Akron and died when it crashed into the sea during a storm, virtually ending the airship program. Moffett nevertheless had skillfully laid the foundations for the aviation - dominated navy that would emerge in World War II.

The life of this "essential man" is told by William F. Trimble in Admiral William A. Moffett: Architect of Naval Aviation (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994). This is an excellent book that gives a clear and sympathetic portrait of Moffett, arguing that his firm but enlightened leadership was essential in the successful development of naval aviation. There were many younger, more aggressive, and more knowledgeable naval aviators about, but Moffett's strong background as a surface officer gave him a credibility and trust with his superiors the others could not match. Moffett did not challenge his superiors as did Billy Mitchell in the Army, and he did not demand a separate service. Instead, he preached the necessity of keeping aviation as an integral part of the fleet. He told his young aviators to remember always that they were naval officers first and airmen second. This deft handling of the loyalty issue was crucial, and Trimble implies it saved the air arm from amputation. At the same time, the author argues that the tactics of Mitchell and his propaganda campaign provided Moffett the lever he needed to energize the naval hierarchy to form the aeronautical bureau. This is a balanced account, and Trimble notes that Moffett was often dictatorial and stubborn and tended to push projects like large airships and small aircraft carriers long after it was clear they were bad ideas. Nonetheless, the admiral was indeed the right man at the right time. Without his vision and political acumen, naval aviation would have evolved far differently.

The Build: CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE...

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

[IMAGE
[IMAGE
[IMAGE

NEXT:

FF-59 Royal Aircraft Factory SE5

Parker Information Resources
Houston, Texas
E - mail: bparker@parkerinfo.com
[PIR]

The HTML Writers Guild
Notepad only
[raphael]
[hbd]
[Netscape]
[PIR]