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Easy Built Models FF-52 Taylorcraft
Wingspan: 50"
Class: Scale flyer
Building Skill / Flying Skill: Easy / Experienced

Kit FF-52 Taylorcraft is a 1/8 scale, flying model that uses the Box and Former method of construction. This jumbo model is very popular for conversion to electric or gas powered flight. Pre-1942 design, eligible for Society of Antique Modelers (SAM) contests. A superb flying model.

This free flight rubber powered kit contains a full-size rolled plan, building and flying instructions, hand-picked competition weight printed balsa and balsa stripwood, rubber motor, propeller, thrust button, clear plastic for the windshield, wheels, landing gear wire, and Easy Built Lite tissue in yellow. You will need a building board, hobby knife, fine sandpaper, and glue.

The Taylor Cub was originally designed by C. Gilbert Taylor as a small, light and simple utility aircraft, evolved from the Arrowing Chummy. It is the forefather of the popular Piper J-3 Cub, over 20,000 of which were built.

In 1930, C. G. Taylor and the Taylor Aircraft Company embarked on the production of a two-seat tandem low-powered aircraft, designated the Taylor Cub. The Cub featured a design with wings mounted high on the fuselage, an open cockpit, fabric-covered tubular steel fuselage and wooden wings which used the USA-35B airfoil. It was originally powered by a 20 horsepower (14.9 kilowatt) Brownback "Tiger Kitten" engine. Since the young offspring of the tiger is called a cub, Taylor's accountant, Gilbert Hadrel, was inspired to name the little airplane "The Cub".

The "Tiger Kitten" engine roared but was not strong enough to power the Cub. On September 12, 1930, a test flight of the Taylor Cub ended abruptly when the aircraft ran out of runway; the underpowered engine was unable to lift the monoplane higher than five feet (1.5 meters) above the ground. In October, a Salmson AD-9 radial engine produced in France was fitted to the Cub giving good performance, but it was expensive to maintain.

Finally in February 1931, Taylor introduced an improved Cub airframe, powered by the newly developed Continental Motors 37 horsepower (27.6 kilowatt) A-40 engine. The new Taylor E-2 Cub was awarded Category 2 or "Memo" certificate 2-358 on June 15, 1931 and licensed by the U.S. Department of Commerce for manufacture (it was later awarded full Approved Type Certificate A-455 on November 7). Twenty-two E-2 Cubs were sold during 1931, retailing for $1,325; by 1935, cost had increased to $1475 and by the end of production in February 1936, 353 Cubs had been built at Emery Airport, Bradford.

The Build: CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE... ebmtaylorcraft01

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Easy Built Models FF-53 Stinson Voyager

Parker Information Resources
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E - mail: bparker@parkerinfo.com
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